#IndyRef 3 years on: another world is possible

Three years on from the independence referendum, politics is moving ever faster. In looking back we must look forward.

“In some decades nothing happens, in some weeks decades happen.”

It feels like we’re living in a decade of weeks in which decades happen. Political change keeps accelerating – from the student protests in 2010 to the ongoing mess the UK government is making of Brexit. 

There’s much to regret in this. It’s been a decade of right-wing rule in the UK, people’s lives have been very badly damaged by austerity, the NHS in England is close to collapse, and the ongoing attack on immigrants is a political stain.

But the 2014 Scottish independence referendum stands apart from this. It was here that the left began to learn how to win. The issue of independence isn’t one that is necessarily of the left. For much of the campaign opponents of independence tried to characterise it as a right-wing cause. That characterisation didn’t stand up to much scrutiny, and the reason behind that is what was so invigorating about the campaign. We believed that another Scotland was possible.

For the first time in my political lifetime ideas had the space to breathe on the left. We weren’t campaigning to have ‘our people’ cut taxes, remove regulations and privatise things, rather than letting ‘their people’ do it. We moved from opposing austerity to building support for alternatives.

Ideas that had been fringe and underappreciated gained new currency. We talked about the opportunities for a Citizen’s Basic Income, for a Land Value Tax, for a profoundly different type of government. People became engaged in a popular debate about the benefits of a Scottish currency.

Through 2 years of public meetings we moved from a triangulated set of proposals to tweak the post-Thatcherite consensus of British politics to a lively carnival of ideas. This was the first time I’d seen movement politics truly manifested. The old, neoliberal politics was knocked sideways. There were repeated calls to stop such debate, because it was distasteful.

And that way of doing politics hasn’t died. The ideas popularised through the referendum have worked their way into the latest Scottish Government “Programme for Government.” The Women for Independence campaign against a new national women’s prison quickly secured victory. The work of organisations like Common Weal has put a National Investment Bank on the agenda. But most of all, it created a new way of doing politics: exciting, progressive, idea-rich and transformative for society.

Armed with more access to information than ever before, with a combination of online and offline meetings, and faced with a ruling hegemony deep in crisis this way of doing politics may change the 21st century as the pamphleteers changed the 17th century, or trade unions changed the 20th century.

Of course many people found this difficult. The neoliberal consensus came with a comforting disdain for debate, disagreement and discussion. Learning to do politics again can mean people take their passions too far. The answer was not to exclude debate, it was to find ways to channel those passions constructively. During the campaign that was, I think, a success.

It’s hard not to see echoes of this movement-politics in the campaign to elect Bernie Sanders and in the Corbyn movement. It is far from perfect, but if we are to create a better world democratically we need to learn from this unforgettable political moment. With more access to communication tools at lower cost than ever before, the weeks in which decades happen will come more and more frequently. Popular movements can help harness those decisive moments for progressive change. It’s not just another Scotland that is possible. Another world is possible.

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History is back

In the last week Scottish politics has had a shock and a surprise. Kezia Dugdale’s resignation came as a shock to most. In the timing at least. And the Scottish Government’s Programme for Government is a (pleasant) surprise.

Both are results of the June General Election.

Both have one thing in common – they mark the end of centrism and triangulation in Scottish politics. At least for the present. A centrist leader of the Scottish Labour Party simply saw her party leave her. Far from her prediction that a move to the left would leave the party ‘carping from the sidelines’, the June election showed that a radical programme could profoundly change the debate.

The shock created by Labour’s success was all the greater because that success was based on a very political, ideological manifesto. That Labour was able to overcome an almost unprecedented set of barriers made the shock even more significant. The Labour Party wasn’t just profoundly split. It faced an almost entirely hostile media, a leader who started the election period with terrible ratings, a muddled position on Brexit and a poor recent track-record in elections.

The decisive moment in transforming this situation came with the launch of the Labour manifesto. The initial media reception was one of (metaphorical) eye-rolling. But it was popular with the public.

It allowed Labour to deny the Conservatives a majority. Even against the background of Brexit and despite the Conservative move into Labour territory on issues like worker involvement and a play to economic nationalism, they only gained 2 Labour seats in England.

In 1989 Francis Fukuyama wrote a widely cited essay called “The End of History.” His contention was that with the collapse of the USSR only liberal democracy and capitalist economies remained. The right had won the ideological contest of the modern era, and with it, history had ended. This informed a political strategy of appealing to the ‘centre-ground’ – the only place where an election could be won from.

The parties that had behaved according to the rules of the 1990s political universe, the Liberal Democrats and the SNP woefully underperformed expectations. Both thought that having captured the ‘centre ground’ they would reap hundreds of thousands of Labour votes. They didn’t. In Scotland Labour gained because of the manifesto. They did that despite the centrist leanings of their leader.

The iron rule that elections were won from the centre was shown to be wrong. The fundamental claim of centrists was always that their approach gave the best chance of electoral success. This was exposed by the June General Election not just to be wrong, but to be profoundly wrong.

With no prospect of the Labour party moving back to the right and with the removal of the  ideological cudgel that dictated centrism was the only road to electoral success Kezia Dugdale saw the writing on the wall and resigned.

Which brings us to the SNP. With the evidence that the centrist approach didn’t work, outflanked by Corbyn in the UK and the Greens in Scotland, they are trying a new approach.

The programme for government is bold (at least in the range of consultations). It contains policies considered too radical even for Green manifestos in the past. It marks an end to the Scottish Government’s safety first centrism.

History is no longer at an end. Ideology is back. And politics will be much the better for it.

The Community Right to Buy and #SaveBellfield show the way to a new politics

Great news – both Scottish Ministers and the church trustees have approved the buyout of Portobello’s Bellfield Church. The first urban buy out under the Community Empowerment Act.

I’m delighted that this idea, which (I think) first featured in an SCVO manifesto in 2010, I co-authored with Sarah Beattie-Smith is making its way into reality. And in a place I love.

I’m very grateful to those who’ve spent so much time on this, not least Justin Kenrick who planted the seed of the idea, and Mary Campbell who has done so much work to make it happen, alongside the many, many hours devoted to the buy out by super-dedicated community activists.

So many of the political problems we face today are the result of people feeling disconnected from the problems that they face. From the 1990s onwards the drive of the market into every relationship has robbed people of control of their lives. That’s primarily a failure of democracy. And it’s very difficult to see how we can go back to the ‘delivery state’ that so effectively built council houses, eliminated infectious diseases like tuberculosis and created the modern infrastructure of this country.

The aim of the community right to buy is to pioneer a new way of living and working together. One that isn’t either the ‘delivery state’ that worked well in the mid-20th Century, or the market, which has so spectacularly failed in the last 10 years.

The opportunity to decide how our lives work, together with those who live around us, is one of the fundamental characteristics of being human. Learning how to do that better will be at the heart of overcoming the challenges we face, from inequality to climate change.

The Bellfield buy-out (and other initiatives like the Edinburgh Student Housing Cooperative) make a start – a small one – but pioneering these ways of working will be vital. So thanks to everyone who’s got us this far. and here’s to building the future.

 

Has austerity ended? 

Today’s budget really crystallised something for me. Since 2008 there has been an incessant demand for cuts. This was accepted across the media and leadership of most political parties. 

The argument went that the UK’s national debt was too high and that cuts would allow us to pay off this debt. Both those assumptions were wrong. The national debt wasn’t too high. And cuts would never help us pay debt off. 

Parties and politicians who made the argument that this was wrong were laughed out and shouted down. Journalists and economists (even those with Nobel prizes) who made this argument were marginalised. There was to be no space for alternatives to austerity. 

The reality has been that cuts removed demand from the economy, reducing tax take and actually increasing debt. 

People have starved to death because of cuts to social security. Our world-leading renewables industry has lost almost all support. Jobs have been destroyed and lives ruined. 

Then Brexit came and put intolerable strain on this economic-political settlement. 

And it’s this point that has crystallised for me today. The Chancellor, Philip Hammond had abandoned the target date to get the economy into surplus. Yet those who silenced the politicians, parties, journalists and economists who objected to austerity are themselves now strangely silent. 

What struck me is that it is now entirely clear that they never believed in austerity for the reasons they said they did. It was never about debt or deficit. It was always a tool to discipline the poor. And now there’s a much better tool. Which is the full power to dismantle the social rights associated with, and protected by, European structures. 

Those rights were, of course, always limited and came with deeply undesirable regulations appearing to require privatisation and tendering of services. Procurement is a nightmare not helped by European regulation. 
But nevertheless the European institutions were perceived, especially by elites, as a major hurdle to dismantling protection for workers and the poor. 

It’s infuriating that the stick used to beat the social democratic consensus has been dropped so rapidly and with so little contrition from those who both used it so vigorously and who have now so swiftly moved on. 

And are we now seeing a move from one strategy to another? From the use of austerity to create the imperative to shrink the state to another strategy that uses Brexit as the pretext for attacks on workers? And how do we respond to that? 

The Three Words


hamish-the-poet

Since the result on Tuesday I’ve had this going round and round in my head. It’s by Hamish Henderson, and I found it in Tim Neat’s superb biography of the poet and radical. Hamish was in Germany arranging the transport to safety of Jewish children right up to the outbreak of war. Someone who fought fascism through Africa and Europe in the 1940s, and who was a leading figure in the anti-Apartheid movement.

His words and his actions should be with us now:


“The Three Words

Love: Love is the only God that I believe in. The books of the Holy Bible never say but one time just exactly what love is, and in those three little words it pours out a hundred million college educations, and says, God is love.

And that is the only real definitive answer to the ten thousand wild queries and questions that I my own self tossed at my bible — that is the only real sensible easy honest warm plain quick and clear answer I found — when I was too ready to throw so-called cowardly thieving poisonous religion out of my back door. It was those three words that made not only religion but also several other sorts of superstitious fears and hatreds in me meet a very quick death.

God is love. God is really love. Love casts out hate. Love gets rid of all fears. Love washes all clean. Love forgives all debts. Love forgets all mistakes. Love overcomes all errors, and excuses and pardons and understands the reason why the mistake, the error, the stumble was made. Love heals all. Love operates faster and surer than time or space or both.

Love does not command you, order you, dictate to you. Love asks rather for you to tell its forces what to do, and where to go, and how to build up your planet here by the blueprint plan of your heart’s desire. Love can’t operate on your behalf as long as your own sickly fear will not permit love to operate on your behalf.

Your love commands must ever be just exactly the direct opposite of war’s crazy baseless hatreds, peace, peace, and sweet peace must be the song on your tongue tip.

— Peace is love. Love is peace. —

Your love command must for all eternity be your peace command.”

Why I’m standing with Sarah Beattie-Smith to be ECC Convener

We are standing together to be Co-Conveners of this committee because we believe we have the skills, experience and vision to deliver our best ever election result next year.

The Holyrood election is the launch pad for Green success over the next 10 years. It gives us the opportunity to win Councillors across Scotland in 2017 and an MEP in 2019. But more than that; it will give us the opportunity to make the case for:

• A more democratic Scotland

• A Scotland with equality at its heart

• Global and local action to tackle climate change and end poverty

We are experienced campaigners, having both been

• Westminster Candidates,

• Members of ECC

• Branch co-conveners.

This gives us the perfect mix of experience to deliver a strong campaign.

We’ve worked together on numerous campaigns both for the party and in our professional lives. We already make a great team with each of us playing to our strengths, whether strategy and messaging or practical support for branches.  We want to build on that to create an inclusive and welcoming Elections and Campaigns Committee in this crucial year.

Our party needs a campaign that every member can be a part of. We commit to drawing on expertise from across the party and making this our most inclusive campaign yet.

We promise to…

  1. Clearly communicate on strategy with branches and members so we’re all on the same page
  2. Work closely with the manifesto team to turn Green ideas into our strongest campaign yet
  3. Equip branches and members with the tools they need to campaign in their communities, including canvassing and data capture
  4. Make sure branches and regional boards know what they can expect from the party and what they can contribute, whether on fundraising, messaging or skills
  5. Involve members by crowdsourcing ideas, building teams and being available to all

Over the past 3 years the Scottish Green Party has put social and environmental justice at the heart of Scotland’s political culture. Our party has become a central part of the progressive movement. The 2016 election offers us a fantastic opportunity to put our Green vision at the heart of Parliamentary politics. We can give voice to those who want to see a social security system worthy of the name, who want real power for all our communities, and who don’t want big businesses to be given the chance to frack under their homes.

To do that we need to be true to our Green values. That means being thoughtful, cooperative and idealistic. It means emphasising that politics can make a real difference to people’s lives. It means going beyond partisanship to make the vital changes we need in society.

We pledge to support members and local parties to deliver a better campaign than ever before. We promise to harness the opportunities our larger membership gives us to make a difference. That means better online campaigning, more resources for branches to run ground campaigns and an approach that builds teams who can help us get seats in Council Chambers across Scotland in 2017.

We need to seize this opportunity to change our politics and our economy.

We need to be bold.

Vote Beattie-Smith/McColl #1

Rector’s Charter

While I was Rector’s Assessor to Mark Ballard, the then Rectors of Scottish Universities drew up a charter for Rectors. This covers what a Rector should do, what the commitment should be and how a Rector should behave.

Since Higher Education Governance is again a live topic, I thought it would be useful to post the Charter Rectors charter (.docx file) for people to see, and maybe even use.

Rector’s Charter

I (name of candidate) confirm my commitment, if elected as rector, to:

– give a guaranteed minimum of time to the university (an average of 2 days a month during the academic year);

– get to know the university in the round – students, academic, non academic, estate;

– be available to meet/liaise with students in societies, residences and academic settings;

– hold regular surgeries as opportunities for direct consultation (preferably at least one monthly);

– attend all Court meetings;

– recognise that as Rector I have the right to preside over Court meetings;

– to chair impartially and allow all voices to be fairly heard;

– ensure student views not overlooked, in and out of Court;

– use the right to attend all Court sub-committee meetings when I see it as appropriate;

– use my best offices in the service of good governance – open, fair, accountable;

– appoint an assessor;

– liaise with rectors of other Universities in twice yearly meetings of the Rectors’ Group to address shared issues;

– act as advocate for the universities with rectorships;

– be accessible to the SRC and sabbaticals as required;

– promote and act as advocate for the role of rector to the student body itself.

Signed………………………………………………………Date……..…………

– promote and act as advocate for the role of rector to the student body itself.

Signed………………………………………………………Date……..…………